PetMed Animal Health Center

2400 Gateway Dive
Dubuque, IA 52003

(563)583-8387

www.dbqpetmed.com

SURGERY

Common Procedure For Most Surgeries

We perform surgeries on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. We ask that the pet does not consume food or water after midnight the night before. Drop-off time is between 7:30 AM and 8:00 AM the morning of the surgery.

Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package (Dogs & Cats): This package includes a blood chemistry panel, a CBC, & IV fluids throughout the procedure. Because most anesthetics are removed from the body by the liver & kidneys, it's important to check that these organs are functioning properly before undergoing anesthesia. Bloodwork allows us to check your pets kidney and liver levels to ensure that anesthesia is safe for them. We also recommend the use of IV fluids during all surgical procedures. This fluid therapy is designed to maintain blood pressure, replace blood loss, ease the administration of life saving drugs if needed, and has been proven to decrease recovery time. Although optional, the Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package is highly recommended.


Spaying

Why it should be done: When your female pet has reached 4-6 months of age, spaying can be done. Spaying your pet can have many benefits such as preventing an unwanted pregnancy and decreasing the risk of developing mammary cancer. It also prevents pyometra, a life-threatening infection of the uterus that often occurs in older female dogs.

Procedure: Spaying involves removing the uterus and ovaries and is typically a same-day surgery. Once complete, your pet will be closely monitored by our staff until it is safe to go home in the afternoon. Medication will be dispensed as well as an e-collar to limit scratching and licking the incision. Suture removal will be needed 10 days after the surgery. 


Neutering

Why it should be done: When your male pet has reached 4-6 months of age, neutering can be done. Neutering your pet can have many benefits such as preventing unwanted breeding and reduces the risk of interdog aggression, roaming, urine marking and mounting behaviors. It also greatly reduces the risk of prostate cancer, prostatitis and perianal tumors.

Procedure: Neutering involves removing the testicles and spermatic cords and is typically a same-day procedure. Once complete, your pet will be closely monitored by our staff until it is safe to go home in the afternoon. Medication will be dispensed as well as an e-collar to limit scratching and licking the incision. Suture removal will be needed 10 days after the surgery. 


Non-Invasive Gastrointestinal Pexi with Scope

What is it: Gastric Dilatation Volvulus, or GDV, is a life-threatening condition in which the dog's stomach bloats and twists around in the abdomen. As the stomach twists, it pinches off the esophagus, preventing the dog from releasing the excess gas build-up in the stomach. Not only can this result in the stomach rupturing, but it makes it impossible for the dog to take a normal breath and crushes the major veins and arteries, leading to circulatory collapse and death.

Most common: GDV is most often seen in large breed dogs, such as Standard Poodles, Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Mastiffs, German Shepherds, Setters, and other deep-chested breeds. Dogs over the age of 7 years old are the most at risk. Treatment must be immediate and aggressive, often resulting in emergency surgery. 

Procedure: A Gastropexy procedure is done to prevent the "Volvulus", or twisting component of a GDV. This surgery involves attaching the pyloric region of the stomach to the body wall, preventing it from moving in the event that the dogs stomach were to bloat. Here at PetMed, we have the ability to perform an Endoscope Guided Gastropexy. The use of our scope allows us to fill the stomach with air and access it from a very small (4-5cm) incision made on the dogs right side. This allows superior visualization and access to the dogs stomach without the use of a large incision.


Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair

What is it: The cranial cruciate ligament, or CCL, is an important structure in the knee joint of a dog. The CCL, equivalent to the ACL in humans, is one of the most common orthopedic injuries that dogs experience. It occurs most often in large breed dogs such as Labrador Retreivers, Golden Retrievers, and PitBull Terriers.

Procedure: In order to diagnose a cruciate ligament injury, our veterinarians will do an exam and take radiographs of the affected leg. Unfortunately, treatment for this injury involves surgery. Our veterinarians perform a procedure that involves placing a suture line in the knee that imitates what the CCL does normally.


In addition to those listed above, we are also able to perform several other types of surgeries such as:

Fracture Repairs

Gastrointestinal Surgeries - foreign body removals, biopsies, and mass removals.

Eye Surgeries - corneal ulcer repairs, mass removals, and repair of eyelid defects such as entropian and ectropian conditions.